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compassionate culture

After #NHSMeToo went viral, DAUK launched a subsequent campaign lobbying for a Compassionate Culture. After enabling doctors to speak up about instances of bullying and mistreatment, we are now asking doctors to share their positive experiences, where they have been treated with compassion. Through our campaign we hope to share and disseminate examples of exemplary practice to encourage a change in culture and a move towards a kinder NHS which treats staff with compassion.

 

nhs me too

The NHS is Britain’s greatest treasure. Yet it still harbours a culture of hierarchy and mechanisms whereby bullying and harassment go unchallenged. We believe that bullying, and discouraging victims from speaking up goes hand in hand with a blame culture. In response to reports that bullying is on the rise, DAUK are teaming up with our Royal Colleges as part of a wider anti-bullying alliance.

learn not blame

Learn Not Blame is a doctor led campaign which seeks to change the culture in the NHS from the ground up. We aim to empower individual doctors to be part of a transformational change process working towards a revolution in the culture of the NHS and bring doctors together collectively to call for an open, just culture that focuses on learning for patient safety.

 

Scrap the cap

Today in hospitals all across the country, doctors on the front lines of the NHS are staffing critically undermanned medical rotas. Despite this, several hundred doctors have been refused Tier 2 visas for highly skilled workers to take up posts that they had successfully applied for in the NHS due to arbitrary visa caps. DAUK successfully petitioned on Theresa May to exempt overseas doctors coming to work in the NHS from visa caps. Read more about our victory.

 

dr nnaemeka chidumije

Dr Chidumije is an NHS surgeon. Following a separation from his wife Dr Chidumije was advised by the Home Office to switch from a spousal visa to a Tier 2 Visa, and advised to return to the Nigeria, his home country, to do so. His application has now been refused four times. The NHS is short of a surgeon, and Dr Chidumije is miles from home. DAUK are co-ordinating a campaign for him to be granted a visa immediately, allowing him to return to his job as a surgeon in the NHS.